IRS Releases Final Forms and Instructions for 2018 ACA Reporting
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released instructions for both the Forms 1094-B and 1095-B and the Forms 1094-C and 1095-C and Forms 1094-B, 1095-B,1094-C, and 1095-C.
What Employers Need to Know About IRS Reporting in 2019
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's reporting requirements are rapidly approaching for employers with group health plans or with 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees. This webinar will provide an overview of the reporting process, what we learned from earlier rounds of reporting, and how employers should be tracking employees.
Giving Thanks in the Office
While our personal lives may offer plenty of opportunities to give thanks, it's also important to make a habit of it in our professional lives, according to an article in the Cobb Business Journal. Few people in a study cited expressed gratitude for their work, and that might be because a culture of gratitude needs to be cultivated in the office, and from the top.
8 Ways to Relate to Time as a Realist
Productivity and time management expert Julie Morgenstern believes people can be grouped two ways when it comes to time management: Time realists and time optimists. Time realists consider how long things take and what is going on in any given day. Time optimists are guided by what they hope to get done.
Tri-Agency Proposed Rule on Health Reimbursement Arrangements
The Department of the Treasury (Treasury), Department of Labor (DOL), and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) (collectively, the Departments) released their proposed rule regarding health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) and other account-based group health plans. The DOL also issued a news release and fact sheet on the proposed rule.
Be the Boss You Want to See in the World
An article in the Harvard Business Review suggests that the traits that make someone become a leader aren’t always the ones that make someone an effective leader. Instead, efficacy can be traced to ethicality. Here are a few tips to be an ethical leader.
Making a Remote Team Work
In a tight labor market, a candidate’s potential commute can make a job more or less attractive. HumanResources reports that a quarter of employees surveyed had left a job because of the commute. When looking at just Millennials, the number jumps to one third. Employees can be choosy, selecting a job that offers more of what they want, and that means less of a commute. Companies can work around this by offering transportation amenities, flexible scheduling or more remote working opportunities.
Shrinking Talent Pools Mean Shifting Hiring Strategies
The labor market is tighter than ever, so people in hiring capacities need to be ready to win potential workers from competitors.
Employer Policies and Testing Employees for Marijuana Use and Opioid Use
This webinar will cover what employers should consider when implementing drug use policies and testing for drug use.
Moments of Clarity: Being Transparent
Companies and politicians like to say that they’re transparent, when in fact, they’re often the opposite. And, as in nature, in the absence of facts, people will often fill their minds with what is perceived.
Use Caution When Operating a Car or Dangerous Machinery
Everybody knows that you shouldn’t drink and drive. However, not everyone knows that prescription drugs can also impair a person’s ability to drive, or operate machinery.

HR Q&A: What does the law say regarding harmful employee social media activity?

An employee’s right to comment on his or her employer may be protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Provisions of this act, such as the right of employees to discuss, question or criticize their terms and conditions of employment, extend to unionized and nonunionized workers.

Under the NLRA, if an employee is addressing group concerns or is acting on behalf of others, those activities are protected and employers may not take disciplinary action against the employee. This protection extends to social media posts and situations where employees have commented on or “liked” co-workers’ online posts made during or outside of working hours.

However, this protection does not apply to outrageously disgraceful or shameful conduct and reckless or maliciously untrue communications. In addition, individuals are not protected by the NLRA when they act in their own interests or address purely personal complaints.

To avoid violating NLRA protections for employees using social media, employers should adopt policies that are narrowly tailored to:

  • Prevent discriminatory remarks, harassment, bullying, threats of violence and other behavior that is unacceptable at the workplace;
  • Request that employees identify that their comments are their personal opinions and do not represent their employers’ official positions on any specific issues; and
  • Request that employees do not disclose trade secrets, publish internal reports, provide tips based on inside information or participate in other activities that may be considered inside trading.

Employers wishing to manage their online reputation should refrain from participating in controversial practices such as requiring employees to disclose their personal social media login information. Many states have laws prohibiting such conduct by employers.